Posts Tagged ‘Amazing World of DC Comics’


Here’s an interesting article by Mark Evanier about the Fox and the Crow comic books that DC used to published for 20 or so years. It comes from the Amazing World of DC Comics #13, October 1976. It’s an interesting article about how this duo made the transition from animation to comic books. I must admit that I am quite fond of the Fox and Crow cartoons that I have seen, especially Tashlin’s the Fox and the Grapes, even though this cartoon is atypical of the rest of the series that was directed by Bob Wickersham.

I have found a few scans of the old Fox and Crow cartoons that I may post in the future. I must say that Evanier’s comment about people being more appreciative of ‘funny animal’ comics no longer holds up today, especially at DC where superheroes reign supreme. Today at DC their funny animal comics Looney Tunes comics are aimed squarely at children and tend to be poorly written and marketed.


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I first became aware of this story by David V. Reed after reading Robbie Reed’s excellent Dial B For Blog article on Bill Finger’s contribution to Batman and DC Comics. It appeared in the Amazing World of DC Comics #10, just a year or so after Finger’s death in 1974. What is most ironic is that in the Amazing World of DC Comics #1 DC published this tribute to Finger.
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Robbie Reed posted just a page of the tasteless story, but here is the whole kit and caboodle from Amazing World of DC Comics #10.






I really don’t see why DC would publish this story, especially as Finger was quite a loyal company guy (I’m sure other comics’ companies would have loved him writing for them), and wrote over 1500 stories for DC. I don’t see why they would disrespect someone just after their death just because he missed a few deadlines or regularly needed he wages advanced to him. I wonder if this was David Reed showing his jealousy for Finger, as a lot of Reed’s stories from the 50s were assumed by many fans to have been written by Finger? Still, that doesn’t explain why DC would publish a story that was one mans grudge against a fellow writer, and I’m sure Finger would be a guy who would want everyone to be credited for what they actually did. Maybe this was payback by DC over Finger exposing the fact that for almost 30 years DC gave him no credit for his part in the creation of Batman? I also have to ask why the editor of AWoDC, Paul Levitz, would allow the story to be published?